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What You Need to Know about Trigger Finger

Trigger finger, or stenosing tenosynovitis, is a painful condition in which the finger(s) or thumb catch or lock when bended. It can affect one or more fingers at a time and can occur in both hands. When the thumb is affected by this condition, it is called ‘trigger thumb.’

Our tendons are fibrous cords that attach muscle to bone and facilitate their movement. Trigger finger, or trigger thumb, generally results from inflammation in a tendon sheath which restricts the motion of the tendon. Occasionally, a bump, or nodule, in the tendon will also form.

If left untreated, the affected finger or thumb may become permanently stuck in a bent or straightened position. It can be painful and can make everyday tasks difficult.

 

The Ideal Candidate Almost anyone who is experiencing trigger finger, or trigger thumb, is an eligible candidate for treatment.
Target Areas The fingers and thumbs are the target areas of trigger finger treatment.
Average Cost This procedure is covered by OHIP with a physician’s referral.
The Ideal Candidate
Almost anyone who is experiencing trigger finger, or trigger thumb, is an eligible candidate for treatment.
Target Areas
The fingers and thumbs are the target areas of trigger finger treatment.
Average Cost
This procedure is covered by OHIP with a physician’s referral.

 

The Treatment Process 

Following an assessment and consultation with Dr. Sleightholm, an appropriate treatment procedure will be recommended. If a patient is experiencing sever or chronic trigger finger/thumb, the following procedures may be recommended:

  • Steroid injections
  • Surgical incision

If steroid injections are deemed appropriate, the doctor will inject a steroid medication into or near the tendon sheath of the affected finger/thumb. This allows the tendon to glide more freely, allowing for a greater range of motion and flexibility for the patients’ finger/thumb. This procedure typically lasts for up to one year, but may require more than one injection to be effective.

If surgical incision is recommended, anesthetic will be administered, and the area will be numbed. A tourniquet will be used to restrict blood flow to the area while a small incision near the base of the affected finger will be made and the doctor will snip the constricted section of the tendon sheath.

It often takes up to 6 weeks for the finger/thumb to heal completely, however, once healed, the finger/thumb will move more easily and without pain. The patient may be required to take time off of work depending on their occupation. If their job requires minimal or no use of the hand, the patient may be able to go to work within 1 to 2 days post-procedure.

The patient will be required to return about 10 days post-procedure for sutures to be removed.
 

Find out If Trigger Finger Treatment Will Be Right for You

Schedule a Trigger Finger Treatment Consultation

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